Master Index >

The Calculating Stars (Book)

See The Calculating Stars on Amazon.com.

See The Calculating Stars at Apple.

The Incomparable 472: 33 Percent Rule

Our Book Club returns with reviews of the six finalists for the Hugo Award for best science fiction/fantasy novel of the year. You’ll be thrilled by our panelists attempting to remember what happened in books they read months ago! We liked five out of the six, which is a great batting average—but oh, that sixth book. Also, we read some novellas and short stories, too! And Erika’s up for another Hugo!

Jason Snell with Erika Ensign, Aleen Simms and Scott McNulty


The Incomparable 461: Team Jerkface

It’s time once again for our Book Club to tackle the six novels that made it to the Science Fiction Writers Association’s shortlist, the nominees for the Nebula Awards. All four of us read all six nominees and we discuss their merits (and occasionally demerits). The concept of being a Reverse Nemesis With a Twist is introduced. If you’re looking for a few books to add to your reading list, this episode will hit the spot.

Jason Snell with Erika Ensign, Scott McNulty and Aleen Simms


The Incomparable 427: A Lot of Rocket Metaphors

This summer we devoured two novels by Mary Robinette Kowal, “The Calculating Stars” and “The Fated Sky.” They’re both exciting tales of space exploration, with well-rounded characters having to navigate challenges both external and internal, cultural and scientific, personal and global. They’re set in an alternate timeline where the Space Race we know happened quite a bit differently, and at the center is the world-famous Lady Astronaut, Elma York. We seriously can’t recommend these books highly enough. Listen in to find out why, and then stick around for a list of other books we really enjoyed!

Jason Snell with Aleen Simms, Kathy Campbell, Marisa McClellan and David J. Loehr


Recently Read 9: "The Calculating Stars" by Mary Robinette Kowal

An alt-history space race with commentary on the science and technology successes and cultural failings of the mid-20th century.

Jason Snell